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Prayer Profile
The Dhodia of India

[IMAGE] The Dhodia are located in the extreme southeastern districts of Gujarat, a state in northwestern India. Their villages lie in the hilly regions south of the Tapi River. The Dhodia are the highest ranking tribe and the third largest tribal group in Gujarat. They speak Dhodia, a Bhil language.

Long ago, prosperity within Gujarat State attracted people from all the surrounding states. Gujarat became a target of the Maratha tribes, who made annual raids to the region for several years. Eventually, the Muslims fortified the area east of Surat in order to reap its economic benefits. War continued between the Monghals, the Maratha, and the Portuguese over the Gujarat territory.

By 1817, the British had risen to power. In the years that followed, they attempted to mend what the Maratha had left by dispersing farmland among the settlers. In 1930, Mahatma Gandhi demanded the British to withdraw from India. The Dhodia, a non-aggressive people, retreated deeper into the hills during the conflict.

What Are Their Lives Like?
The Dhodia consider themselves to be of a higher class than the neighboring Bhil groups. They will not marry other Bhil or even eat with them. Some exceptions are allowed, however, with the Chodhari Bhil. They have more than one wife when they can afford it. The wives are "bought" while they are still young girls. In times past, it was customary to take the bride to the groom's house for the wedding. Today, however, the young couple generally travel to the bride's house to be married. A widow usually remains a part of her husband's family by marrying her deceased husband's brother.

The Dhodia participate in festivals alongside the Hindus who live nearby. They are not really community-minded, but only come together for such things as annual communal fishing and religious feasts. Village leaders only perform certain social duties.

The Dhodia are related to the many Bhil tribes of India. The name "Bhil" comes from the word billee, which literally means "bow." The bow is the characteristic weapon of most Bhil tribes. Ironically, the Dhodia, unlike their Bhil relatives, do not use bows and arrows.

Most Dhodia have given up the nomadic lifestyles of their ancestors and have settled into farming. Forest labor, trade labor (in the cities), hunting, and fishing are secondary to agriculture. Some live in the Surat district, an area well known for its rich soils and fine cotton crop. Others live in areas where, because of the heavy rainfall, they are able to cultivate rice. Still others live in the less fertile, highland areas.

The Dhodia go to the markets to trade their crops for clothing. The women wear blouses under dark green or red cotton saris (long pieces of cloth that are wrapped around the waist and over one shoulder). They also wear necklaces made of lead beads and rupee coins, and silver anklets. Most of the men wear either a "Gandhi" cap or a turban wrapped out of a piece of cloth. Shorts have also become popular among the men.

Dhodia houses are usually scattered near the streams so that they might easily fish and draw water for themselves and their cattle. The homes are typically built by hired labor. They are small bamboo huts made with tiled roofs. The poorer Dhodia live in mud huts that they build themselves. The doors always face north in order to prevent interaction with evil spirits.

What Are Their Beliefs?
Ninety-five percent of the Dhodia Bhil practice ethnic religions. They are very superstitious and have deep-rooted beliefs in demons and witches. They worship groups of deities made of shapeless pieces of stone or wood.

The Dhodia have no temples or places to hold their religious ceremonies. They have only a few stones that have been painted and placed under trees. They believe that the supernatural beings dwell there.

What Are Their Needs?
Many Dhodia are addicted to alcohol and will sell all they possess for a drink. They need to experience the liberating power of Jesus Christ. The Dhodia also desperately need a translation of the Bible in their language.

Prayer Points

  • Pray against the demonic spirits that are keeping the Dhodia blinded to the Truth.
  • Ask God to raise up prayer teams who will break up the soil through worship and intercession.
  • Pray that the Lord of the harvest will send forth faithful Christian laborers to live among the Dhodia and teach them of God's love.
  • Ask God to grant wisdom and favor to the missions agencies that are targeting the Dhodia.
  • Pray that God will raise up qualified linguists to translate the Bible into Dhodia.
  • Ask God to give the Dhodia believers boldness to share the Gospel with their own people.
  • Pray that God will reveal Himself to the Dhodia through dreams and visions.
  • Ask the Lord to raise up strong local churches among the Dhodia.

See also the following Bhil Groups:
Of India: The Bhilala; The Central Bhil; The Chodhari Bhil; The Dangs Bhil; The Dhatki Bhil; The Eastern Bhil Bhilbari; The Pardhi Bhil; The Pawari Bhil; The Tadvi Bhil; The Rajput Garasia; The Adiwasi Garasia.
Of Pakistan: The Meghwar Bhil; The Sansi Bhil.

Latest estimates from the World Evangelization Research Center.


  • People name: Dhodia
  • Country: India
  • Their language: Dhodia
  • Population: (1990) 113,300
    (1995) 124,600
    (2000) 136,100
  • Largest religion: Ethnic religionist 95%
    Nonreligious 4.7%
  • Christians: <1%
  • Church members: 374
  • Scriptures in their own language: None
  • Jesus Film in their own language: None
  • Christian broadcasts in their own language: None
  • Mission agencies working among this people: 1
  • Persons who have heard the Gospel: 26,500 (22%) Those evangelized by local Christians: 6,600 (6%)
    Those evangelized from the outside: 19,900 (16%)
  • Persons who have never heard the Gospel: 98,100 (78%)
  • Country: India
  • Population: (1990) 850,638,100
    (1995) 935,744,300
    (2000) 1,022,021,300
  • Major peoples in size order: Hindi (High Hindi) 9.5%
    Telugu 7.8%
    Maratha 7.4%
    Bengali 6.4%
    Hindi (Bazaar, Popular) 5.5%
  • Major religions: Hindu 78.2%
    Muslim 12%
    Christian 4.3%
  • Number of denominations: 163

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Bethany World Prayer Center

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